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Melanoma Diagnosis Telemedicine Now Available in SA

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Team Molemap Creator
Posted 07/01/13
South Australia’s first telemedicine service for the diagnosis of melanoma skin cancer was today launched in Adelaide.
The state’s first MoleMap clinic has opened at East Adelaide Healthcare in Marden.
There are 49 MoleMap clinics across the rest of Australia and New Zealand and clinics are opening in New York and London.
MoleMap specialises in non-invasive early detection of melanoma. It takes digital images of the body and moles and at the push of a button sends the data to a member of its panel of leading specialist dermatologists, who examines the images, identifies any issues and recommends any necessary course of action, such as removal of the mole or close monitoring.
The images magnify the mole and illuminate its below-the-surface features and blood vessels, enabling MoleMap’s specialist dermatologists to make a more accurate diagnosis.
Each patient is re-photographed from top to toe every 12 months. New and previous images are compared, revealing any new moles and any growth or changes to existing ones. 50% of melanomas occur as new moles. Melanomas, generally, are asymmetrical. Benign moles, generally, are symmetrical. Early detection of melanoma can save a person’s life.
The Australian Government and Cancer Council Australia report that:
  • Australia has one of the highest skin cancer rates in the world, nearly 4 times the rates in the US, Canada and the UK
  • Australians are 4 times more likely to develop a skin cancer than any other form of cancer
  • 2 in 3 Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70
  • Melanoma is the most life-threatening form of skin cancer
  • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44
  • In 2007 there were 10,342 new cases of melanoma, Australia’s 4th most common cancer, and 1,279 melanoma cancer deaths.
MoleMap’s panel of dermatologists is headed by Austrian-born Australian-based Professor of Dermatology Peter Soyer, chair of the Dermatology Research Centre at the University of Queensland and Director of the Dermatology Department at Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane. Professor Soyer is a pioneer of developing knowledge and new technologies to more accurately and non-invasively diagnose melanoma cancer. He co-founded the International Dermoscopy Society, the International Society of Teledermatology and organised the first World Congress of Teledermatology in Graz, Austria, in 2006. He was president of the Third World Congress of Dermoscopy in Brisbane on May 17-19 this year, the congress drawing 830 delegates from 28 countries. It was the first time this world congress was held in the southern hemisphere. The Australasian College of Dermatologists organised the congress.
South Australian small businessman Philip Mann has been travelling to Victoria each year for the past four years to access the MoleMap service. “MoleMap saved my life,” he said. He lost two friends to melanoma cancer and four years ago decided to have his own moles checked. He had too many moles for his local dermatologist to examine. “My dermatologist said ‘it would be great if there was some way we could photograph them and check them that way’. We did some research and discovered MoleMap. The closest centre was in Victoria so I went there,” said Mr Mann, of Clare. MoleMap in Melbourne photographed Mr Mann’s body and moles. Within days, the MoleMap panel member examining his images detected two suspected melanomas. MoleMap immediately phoned Mr Mann to advise him to have them removed. His local
dermatologist removed them. Both were early-stage melanomas, one a rare aggressive type that could have invaded his body within months. “There is no way I would miss my annual trip to MoleMap,” he said.
East Adelaide Healthcare Director Dr Geoff Barrow is a GP who has specialised in skin cancer since 2002. He said he was very pleased to be able to provide the MoleMap service to local patients.“It (MoleMap) is a very elegant solution and makes excellent use of the expertise and knowledge of the specialist dermatologist panel members,” Dr Barrow said. “It’s a more accurate and efficient way of detecting melanomas. It’s simply not good medicine to be cutting out moles that don’t need to be removed.”MoleMap's application of telemedicine diagnosis of melanoma - PDF
Further information at www.molemap.net.au Patient inquiries: 1800 665 362
Media inquiries: Michael Gillies Smith, Gillies Smith Public Affairs, Australia, +61 (0)402 011 503
MoleMap Panel of Specialist Dermatologists:
Professor Peter Soyer is Chair of the Dermatology Research Centre at the University of Queensland and Director of the Dermatology Department at Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane. Professor Soyer is a pioneer of developing knowledge and new technologies to more accurately and non-invasively diagnose melanoma cancer. He co-founded the International Dermoscopy Society, the International Society of Teledermatology and organised the first World Congress of Teledermatology in Graz, Austria, in 2006. He was president of the Third World Congress of Dermoscopy in Brisbane on May 17-19 this year, the congress drawing 830 delegates from 28 countries.
Dr Martin Haskett has been in dermatology practice for more than 25 years and is consultant dermatologist at the Victorian Melanoma Service at The Alfred hospital. He was a board member of the Australasian College of Dermatologists from 2006 to 2009 and currently convenes its taskforce on teledermatology.
Dr Anne Howard is Head of Dermatology at Western Hospital, Footscray, and a past president of the Australasian College of Dermatologists. She is a visiting consultant to the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Royal Children’s Hospital.
Dr Rod Hannaford has been in dermatology practice for 10 years. He was medical director of the Skin and Cancer Foundation Australia, headquartered in Sydney, for seven years. He trains dermatology registrars and lectures on all aspects of dermatology to GPs, medical students and at conferences. Before training in dermatology he was a rural GP for 17 years and dealt with a high burden of skin cancer and melanoma in his local community.
Media inquiries: Michael Gillies Smith, Gillies Smith Public Affairs, Australia, +61 (0)402 011 503

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